What you don't know is waiting for you

Have you given any thought lately to how far you’ve come?

I’ve found that this can be a difficult exercise without photographic proof—so you might want to scroll through your camera roll or wherever you keep your pictures to see what was actually happening this time last year...or the year before...or even five years ago. Pictures tend to really jog our memories in ways that not much else (except maybe for music and smells?) can.

Sure, time goes by fast. There’s no doubt about it. Whether you’re having fun or not, the years that make up adulthood are smaller fractions of your whole existence, so they appear to pass with increasing speed. (Remember how summer stretched out like a lazy cat when you were eight years old?)

But, though it goes fast, so much more happens—we, and our life situations, change in such significant ways—from one year to the next.

So, if you feel stuck right now, if you fear that nothing much changes, or at least not with any real speed, rest assured: In 365 days, you might remember feeling this way (especially if you document it in some way today)...but the feeling itself will be mostly unfamiliar, very likely replaced by a new set of circumstances, challenges, excitements, accomplishments.

And you’ll have done it. You’ll have made that future life for yourself. Crafted it day by day, not knowing exactly how it would unfold, but taking each step forward anyway.

(#tbt to April 22, 2016, moments after we sold our motorhome and before we knew what was next for us. My husband had to help me stuff myself into the passenger seat of our Corolla, and then he drove us east. We had no idea that just two years later, we’d own a sweet little house in Wisconsin, both of us completely self-employed. Big stuff can happen over not big periods of time. Wherever you are in your journey, keep going.)

How's your patience/resolve ratio?

Taking small steps toward your “Impossible” Thing requires a healthy ratio of PATIENCE to RESOLVE.

All at once, you must be willing to hang in there for months or years at a time as your “Impossible” Thing slowly takes shape...and you must be tenacious in the day-to-day in order to drive your vision forward into reality.

Though it will feel like outside circumstances are your biggest challenge, I promise you that won’t ever be the case.

Consider this from William Somerset Maugham, British playwright, novelist, and short story writer from the 1930s:

“If you don’t change your beliefs, your life will be like this forever. Is that good news?”

If you don’t change your beliefs, are you in a good place to actually achieve your “Impossible” Thing? Tell me in the comments how you’re handling your own PATIENCE/RESOLVE ratio these days, and if one or the other needs some attention.